Preparing for an Edwardian-themed event

By | August 30th, 2020|Categories: Edwardian Era, Edwardian Fashion|Tags: , , , , , |

Guess what I did this weekend? Many of our readers will be pleased to know that I rented Somewhere in Time and enjoyed every minute. Though I was quite unsettled by the ending, it is an adorable movie with a great script. And most of all, similar to the experience of watching Sofia Coppola's Marie [...]

Edwardian women fashion: morning, noon, and night

By | August 27th, 2020|Categories: Edwardian Era, Edwardian Fashion|Tags: , , , , , |

The Edwardian Era was a great time for fashion! After the outward social stiffness of the Victorian Era, King VII came onto the stage with a bit of flair and a more relaxed approach, and things slowly started to evolve. With the new century also came a desire for innovation, and designers became increasingly inventive [...]

Femininity in Question: Edwardian Depictions of the New Woman

By | June 22nd, 2020|Categories: Edwardian Era, Women's History|Tags: , , , |

By the end of the Victorian Era, society was changing so fast that some people had a hard time keeping up, much less accepting it. From a cultural standpoint, the first two decades saw advances for women that were more rapid than the Western world had ever before seen. The status quo held on tight [...]

Susan La Flesche Picotte: First Native American Female Physician

By | November 13th, 2018|Categories: Victorian Era, Women's History|Tags: , , , , |

Early Life Susan La Flesche Picotte was the first Native American female physician. She is remembered for breaking racial and gender barriers. Susan was born in 1865 in the Omaha Indian Reservation, daughter to Chief Joseph (called “Iron Eyes”) and Mary Gale (called “One Woman”). Both parents were of mixed race. The chief knew his tribe [...]

Veterans Day: Recognizing American Women 100 years after WWI

By | November 12th, 2018|Categories: Edwardian Era, Women's History|Tags: , , , , , , |

This Veteran’s Day, November 11th, 2018, we celebrate 100 years since the end of World War I. When remembering WWI, the contributions made by American women are often overlooked. American women worked in hospitals, the military, and factories to do their part in the war to end all wars, complementing their counterparts in other parts [...]

Labor Day in the USA – the workers’ holiday

By | September 3rd, 2018|Categories: Edwardian Era, Holidays, Victorian Era, Women's History|Tags: , , , , , |

The Industrial Revolution brought many and lasting changes to the labor force. We moved from a mostly agricultural society to one dominated by mechanization. Men, women, and children as young as five worked long hours in often dangerous conditions. It wasn’t unusual for people to work 12 hours a day, seven days a week for [...]

Frances Perkins – from Massachusetts to the White House

By | March 25th, 2018|Categories: Edwardian Era, Roaring 20s, Victorian Era, Women's History|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Frances Perkins – “I am extraordinarily the product of my grandmother” Frances Perkins was born Fanny Coralie Perkins. She was born on April 10, 1880, in Boston, Massachusetts. Her parents were born in Maine and although the family eventually settled in Worcester, their roots were firmly planted in Newcastle, Maine. Fanny spent her childhood summers [...]

Gertrude Bell

By | March 11th, 2018|Categories: Edwardian Era, Victorian Era, Women's History|Tags: , , , , |

Gertrude Bell - 20th-Century Middle East Influencer Gertrude Margaret Lowthian Bell was born on July 14, 1868, in Washington New Hall, County Durham, England. Her father was the industrialist, Sir Thomas Hugh Bell. Her grandfather was Sir Isaac Lowthian Bell, a Parliamentarian who worked with Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli. She was destined to lead an [...]

The Rookery – Chicago’s Shiny Gem

By | March 25th, 2017|Categories: Edwardian Era, Uncategorized, Victorian Era|Tags: , , , , |

The Rookery is one of the most historically significant buildings in Chicago. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970 and was designated a Chicago Landmark in 1972. This architectural masterpiece was designed by Burnham and Root. It was completed in 1888, during the building boom following the Great Chicago Fire. [...]